Viva la difference!

A lot of conversations around employer brands tend to be laced with jargon – I know because I’m guilty of that myself. One person’s brand pillars are another person’s brand attributes (not to be confused with one man’s trash is another man’s treasure to the more obscure one man’s budgie is another man’s parrot). But in the midst of the battle of nomenclature, I have encountered some basic confusion that is worth discussing, at least for a few paragraphs.

What I’m referring to is the difference between a positioning statement and a tag line. We are all familiar with tag lines. They’re the clever little appendages that pop up at the end of advertisements, from The New York Times’ “All the news that’s fit to print” to Cingular’s “Raising the bar,” crying out to consumers in a last-ditch attempt to be impactful.

Even cities and states get into the act with themes and mottos that act as tag lines. Las Vegas informs us that “What happens in Las Vegas stays in Las Vegas” while New Hampshire commands that we “Live free or die.” (Rumor has it that Wisconsin once tested “Eat cheese or die,” but passed it up for the less militant “Try some cheddar if you feel like it.”)

While tag lines play a less prominent role in employment marketing, they still have a place. Enterprise Rent-A-Car’s “My personal enterprise” and the Naval Reserves’ “Stay strong” are two excellent examples. In each case, the purpose of the tag line is to encapsulate the emotional context of the brand position in a memorable way, whether that be a product brand or an employer brand. In essence, they are jingles minus the music.

Positioning statements are something entirely different. They take value propositions and put them in marketing context, articulating relevance and differentiation in a way that lays out a road map for advertising and communications (there’s that jargon again). They do not appear as headlines, tag lines, or copy. But without the positioning statement, headlines, tag lines, and copy would be nothing more than a wild guess, a hope that whatever is being said actually matters to someone, somewhere.

Kind of like this blog.

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Random Rant
Dear Post Cereals,
Please recall all boxes of your latest version of Alphabits. By eliminating all sugar from the cereal, you have significantly damaged my nostalgic recollections of breakfast as a child. I may sue.

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Thomas Delorme
Written by Thomas Delorme

VP, Digital Products & Strategy

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